melior melior discovery melior pharmaceuticals preclinical services pre-clinical services in vivo pharmacology in vivo efficacy efficacy models pharmacokinetics indications discovery specialized animal models bioanalytical services theratrace exton pennsylvania cro contract research drug discovery drug development metabolic disease alzheimer’s alzheimers diabetes reprofiling
Melior Discovery
home
Therapeutic Areas
Safety Assessment
 


theraTRACE

Melior Pharmaceuticals

melior melior melior discovery melior pharmaceuticals preclinical services pre-clinical services in vivo pharmacology in vivo efficacy efficacy models pharmacokinetics indications discovery specialized animal models bioanalytical services theratrace exton pennsylvania cro contract research drug discovery drug development metabolic disease alzheimer’s alzheimers diabetes reprofiling

Melior Discovery neurology

Haloperidol-Induced Catalepsy Model
Drugs to treat schizophrenia and other psychological disorders induce well-described extrapyramidal side-effects.  These side-effects have been exploited to create an animal model of Catalepsy.  For example, haloperidol administration to mice induces a well-described condition of immobility characterized by muscle rigidity and frozen posture.  This condition in mice resembles similar human conditions in disorders such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.  Indeed, this model has been developed to screen and evaluate test compounds for their ability to reverse these types of disease and drug-inducing cataleptic responses. 
                     Haloperidol-induced catalepsy

Haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice.  Mice were pretreated with vehicle thirty minutes prior to study commencement.  Mice were then treated with either vehicle or Haloperidol at study commencement (time=0) and evaluated for signs of catalepsy at 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after treatment.  The bar test was utilized to determine Haloperidol-induced catalepsy.  This test measures the ability of the animal to respond to drug-induced immobility (Kuschinsky and Homykiewicz, 1972). The test measures the time required (latency) for the animal to remove its forelimbs from an elevated horizontal bar.  Animals were positioned so that their forepaws were resting on a horizontal bar 6.5 cm high and the latency for the animal to remove both forepaws from the bar was recorded.  A cut-off time of 180 seconds was imposed.  In this study, Haloperidol significantly increased the latency to remove both forelimbs from the horizontal bar compared to vehicle treated animals. Data are mean ± SEM; ****p<0.0001 compared to vehicle/vehicle. 

If you are interested in learning more about the Haloperidol-induced catalepsy model, please contact models@meliordiscovery.com to start the conversation.